tactical.vote

UK European elections 2019: Remain candidates
Recommended tactical vote

In South East we recommend a tactical vote for the Lib Dems

Why?

The Lib Dems are most in danger of losing a seat here.

2019 candidates
Change UK1. Richard Ashworth
Remain
2. Victoria Groulef
Remain
3. Warren Morgan
Remain
4. Eleanor Mary Fuller
Remain
5. Robin John Bextor
Remain
Conservative1. Daniel Hannan
Leave
2. Nirj Deva
Leave
3. Richard Robinson
Leave
4. Mike Whiting
Leave
5. Juliette Ash
Leave
Green1. Alexandra Phillips
Remain
2. Elise Benjamin
Remain
3. Vix Lowthion
Remain
4. Leslie Groves Williams
Remain
5. Phélim Mac Cafferty
Remain
Labour1. John Howarth
Remain (evidence)
2. Cathy Shutt
Remain (evidence)
3. Arran Neathey
Remain (evidence)
4. Emma Christina Turnbull
Remain (evidence)
5. Rohit Dasgupta
Remain (evidence)
Lib Dem1. Catherine Bearder
Remain
2. Antony James Hook
Remain
3. Judith Bunting
Remain
4. Martin Tod
Remain
5. Liz Leffman
Remain
Brexit Party1. Nigel Farage
Leave
2. Alexandra Lesley Phillips
Leave
3. Robert Andrew Rowland
Leave
4. Belinda Claire De Camborne Lucy
Leave
5. James Gilbert Bartholomew
Leave
UKIP1. Piers Wauchope
Leave
2. Liz Phillips
Leave
3. Daryll Pitcher
Leave
4. Toby Brothers
Leave
5. Tony Gould
Leave
Some small parties and low-placed list candidates have been omitted to save space.
2014 result (D'Hondt grid)
Party1st seat2nd seat3rd seat4th seat5th seat6th seat7th seat8th seat9th seat10th seat
Conservative723,571361,786241,190180,893144,714120,595103,36790,44680,39772,357
Labour342,775171,388114,25885,69468,55557,12948,96842,84738,08634,278
Lib Dem187,87693,93862,62546,96937,57531,31326,83923,48520,87518,788
UKIP751,439375,720250,480187,860150,288125,240107,34893,93083,49375,144
Green211,706105,85370,56952,92742,34135,28430,24426,46323,52321,171

Read an explanation of this grid

Change in votes to gain/lose seats
PartyTo gain seatTo lose seat
Conservative+27,900-209,500
Labour+33,000-161,900
Lib Dem+187,900-7,000
UKIP+188,000-27,900
Green+164,100-30,900
These figures are rounded.
Explanation

1. European elections in England, Scotland and Wales are counted using the D'Hondt method. Our aim is the most effective use of votes to maximise the number of Remain supporters elected in this somewhat complex system.

2. Based on the 2014 European election results, we have calculated how many votes each party needs to either gain or lose a seat.

3. We can then see whether tactical votes are most effectively used defensively or offensively, and which party is in danger of losing a seat or best placed to gain one.

4. In mixed parties such as Labour, we also consider whether the candidate in that list position is a known Remainer.

Q&A

Do you really need tactical voting in a proportional election?

The D'Hondt system is better than first-past-the-post, but quite flawed despite being theoretically more proportional. You are only able to express one preference, not rank candidates 1, 2, 3, etc as in other systems. The regional seat allocations also disadvantage smaller parties – true proportional representation is impossible when there are only 3 or 4 seats available, for example, and this in turn skews the national result. This means that you need to try to cast your single preference vote optimally.

What about TIG/Change UK?

As it is a new party, it did not take part in the 2014 European elections and so we have no hard evidence as to how it might perform. There are polls, but they fluctuate a lot. No doubt some Remainers will back Change UK, but their lack of electoral track record means that cannot be described as a 'tactical vote'. With the Remain vote split, it is possible that they will win very few or no seats, making votes for them 'wasted' in tactical terms.

What about the Brexit Party?

The Brexit Party is also a new party with no 2014 track record to refer to. It seems likely, however, that it will take most of UKIP's vote this time along a broadly similar geographical pattern. Where the calculation suggests seats being won from or lost to UKIP, in the final result it is likely that will mean the Brexit Party.

What about independents?

The party-list system means independents are very unlikely to be elected. No independent has ever won a UK seat, all the way back to the first European Parliamentary elections in 1979.

Why are you recommending a Labour vote in some areas?

Labour is an unusual case in that its party policy on Brexit is ambiguous. After taking feedback on this issue, we have taken the approach of looking at the positions of MEP candidates instead of parties as a whole, so we advocate a vote for Labour in cases where they are tactically best placed and the candidate who would win a seat is a known Remain supporter.

How can you say these are definitely the best tactical votes?

They are only best-effort recommendations, worked out using the formula explained on these pages, after considering the quirks of the D'Hondt system. There are other methods that could be used, for example a more defensive set of recommendations aimed at always protecting existing seats instead of winning new ones, but we have tried to take a balanced approach based on the maths. Please do send feedback to feedback@tactical.vote

Feedback

Think we’ve got it wrong? Want to suggest a better method? Email feedback@tactical.vote

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I live in Northern Ireland

We're not making recommendations for Northern Ireland because it has different parties and a different electoral system for these elections (using STV).